Consolidating rotten wood

The foot for the Studs has completely rotted in the affected area and the base of the studs are also affected.The Lath and cement ceiling now sports some serious ventilation for the toilet below, and affords rather less privacy than it should…The end of the next structural timber, that runs towards the front of the house, is also affected by rot, but not enough to cause worry, just stop the rot from recurring.As this timber is now inside, and the new bath will have a proper drain, and the new window will be fitted properly, there will be no leaks to worry about, so more rot should not be an issue.Smiths CPES will penetrate deeply into all of the rotten timber, the stuff that we can see, and the stuff that is less rotten that we can’t, by running along the fibres of the wood, and through all rotten areas.These holes can be fairly large, and should penetrate deeply into the timber, but NOT pass through the timber. Rotten timbers can easily consume their volume of CPES.We want the CPES to saturate the rotten wood, not pour down the wall below! Easy mixing by marking a straight jar with marks at 8 and 16cm, and filling to the first with Part A, the second with Part B.

The sawn off cast iron waste pipe was connected (or rather wasn’t connected) to the bath inside, through pipes that ran through the hole.A close look at the timber reveals extensive decay.The top face is soft enough that a screwdriver can be pushed through with negligible pressure. This damage has been caused by a bath drain that has leaked for at least 15 years, and a leaking window above that has also failed many decades ago. There is one joist completely missing from this photo, and the joist on the right has lost the end of itself to rot.The joist on the left is held upright with the small brace to the stud, as it just rests on a brick wall at its other end.The repaired rotten timber frame carries all of the load of the joist, which has the large bath on it.

Consolidating rotten wood